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The “I can do better” writer’s syndrome April 22, 2011

Posted by pacejmiller in Blogging, Misc, On Writing.
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Could you do better than this man?

One thing I have noticed lately, especially on forums, is that certain nameless, faceless people think they can do better than some of the biggest selling authors out there — Dan Brown, Stephenie Meyer, Stieg Larsson — just to name a few.  Even the ones that come short of actually saying it imply it with their trashing of the author’s writing and shock that their books have sold so well.

Sorry to break it to those people, but you can’t.  If you could, you would have done it already.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with critiquing a writer or a piece of work.  Even the most revered masterpieces have their critics.  People have different tastes, and no piece of writing is ever going to please every reader.

But to say you can do better is a big call.  There is so much that goes into putting together a novel than these ‘I can do better’ people can fathom.  Sure, luck does play a role, sometimes a significant one, but at the end of the day, a mixture of skill, talent, perseverance and determination is imperative in putting together a bestseller.  And time — finding the time to actually complete it is probably the biggest obstacle of all.

The truth is, good writing alone is not enough to sell books.  It’s about meeting the demands of the market, bring at the right place at the right time, and having an interesting idea.  An idea that appeals to the masses.

Dan Brown, the creator of The Da Vinci Code, is an oft-targeted author.  His writing is, admittedly, nothing spectacular from a technical standpoint, but it’s adequate.  He also has his strengths, being an excellent craftsman of page turners.  But is that why The Da Vinci Code was such an international phenomenon?  Of course not.  It’s because he identified something when he read Holy Blood, Holy Grail, and realised that it would make an awesome premise for a thriller.  At least one that would be highly controversial.

But was that all he needed, a good idea?  Of course not again.  He must have spent hundreds of hours researching and piecing the story together, and who knows how long he spent creating the novel’s many cryptic puzzles?  Then, he had to actually write the damn thing.  I recall reading somewhere that for every page of The Da Vinci Code, there were another 10 pages that ended up on the cutting room floor.  How can anyone not find that an impressive effort?

There are times when I am reading a particular writer’s work and I don’t think it is any good, and I start wondering if I can write something better.  But I tell myself that it’s one thing to tell yourself that you may have the potential ability to do it, but it’s another thing altogether to actually get it done.

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Comments»

1. Unga Bunga Girl - April 22, 2011

I like this topic and you’ve written this post very well. I’m more an inner monologue kind of writer. Anyway, this post reminds me of a long time ago when I read, “The Bridges of Madison County”.

I’d read a chapter every night and think why do people like this book. He had a very blunt dime store novel writing style. But, then I came to the last few chapters and I couldn’t believe that I was actually balling. Are you kidding me? And then I knew why it was so popular it struck a chord with people on an emotional level. I would never read it again but I respect it now.

I agree that people should be more impressed by the actual accomplishment of completing an entire novel. I know for a fact I couldn’t do it. My attention span is in the weeds. Cheers!

pacejmiller - April 22, 2011

Thanks for commenting! Your attention span is in the ‘weeds’? Maybe you need to stop smoking it :)


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