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Shilin Night Markets! January 7, 2010

Posted by pacejmiller in Taiwan, Travel.
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The massive food hall at Shilin Night Markets

Night markets are popular spots for locals and tourists alike in Taipei, and the biggest, most structured one is the Shilin Night Market.

Shilin Night Market is a great place to visit just to witness Taiwanese culture first hand.  There are loads and loads of people, especially on weekends, wandering through the narrow streets with shops on either sides and street vendors and food stalls scattered wherever there is spare space.

(Click on ‘More…’ to read about the markets and check out the amazing food pictures!)

The busy main strip of Shilin Night Markets

Most of the food has been centralised into a massive food hall, directly across from the MRT station.  To be honest there is nothing outstanding there – you can probably get better quality and tasting food outside – but the good thing is that everything is in one place, so you can sample different types of food, from massive fried chicken to sausages to cold noodles to ice desserts to local specialties.  If your stomach can handle it, have a go!

Inside the food hall

Inside the food hall

It’s impossible to try everything inside the food hall even in two or three visits, but leave a bit a space in any case to try some of the stalls on the outside streets, which are usually smaller and can be eaten while you walk.  There is this marinated fried chicken (from Hsinchu) which is just sensational.  I wished I could have stuffed myself more and tried some of the other tempting delicacies.

Not a great photo - but this awesome fried chicken place is on the adjacent street between the food hall and the main strip

This picture speaks for itself - the marinated flavour underneath the crispy skin...mmm...

As for the shopping, most of it is along the main night market strip, but there are various shops and street vendors scattered around the perimeters.  The better quality stuff (such as clothes and shoes) is to be found in the shops lining the main street.  The street vendors sell the cheaper, low-quality stuff (such as crappy ties, shirts, tracksuits and novelty goods) which are sometimes so cheap it makes you wonder whether there is something wrong with the product.  But be warned – you usually get what you pay for!

Everything is cheap – or at least cheaper than elsewhere, but you need to be selective and know how to haggle in order to get the best prices.  Unless the price is already insanely low, you should be able to shave a bit more off, sometimes a lot more.  If you have the time and patience, take a look around and compare.

Spend at least a couple of hours there, but realistically you’ll probably need three or more if you intend to shop and actually buy stuff.

Ice dessert place inside the food hall

Peanut flavoured shaved ice - literally melts in your mouth

Fruit and syrup on shaved ice!

Getting there

The easiest way there is via the red line on the MRT, but note that the nearest station is actually Jiantan (the stop before Shilin).

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Comments»

1. Kristen - April 9, 2010

thanks for the great post!
i’m planning on stopping in taipei on my way to vietnam and was looking for places to visit. thanks for all the pics and the advice.

i was just wondering, what is the main street of the market?

pacejmiller - April 9, 2010

I just had a look at Google maps. The main street where the food hall is is called JiHe Road. The street where the main night market is is called DaDong St, just off WenLin Road. If you take the MRT to JianTan station you can’t go wrong. You can see the night markets from the station platform.

2. siemin - April 27, 2010

Hi, thank you for your sharing…
I’m a student and research about of the Taiwan’s Shilin Night Market, can you please help me to do a survey regarding on your view of Shilin Night Market, and the website as below as:
http://www.my3q.com/home2/327/ximoon/72104.phtml
Thank you for your helping, and wish you have a nice day. ^^


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